Tag Archives: 105 f/2.8 micro nikkor

Rhododendron 3

Rhododendron. Nikon D200. Nikkor 105 mm Macro. ISO 200. 1/640 sec at f/2.8. May 2014. Copyright Joanne Mason 2014.

Rhododendron. Nikon D200. Nikkor 105 mm Macro. ISO 200. 1/640 sec at f/2.8. May 2014. Copyright Joanne Mason 2014.

More Rhododendrons. There is remarkable diversity of color, size, texture in rhododendrons, of which there are more than 1000 species worldwide.

About these ads

Redwood

Dawn Redwood. Nikon D200. Nikkor 105 mm Macro. ISO 200. 1/80 sec at f/6.7. May 2014. Copyright Joanne Mason 2014.

Dawn Redwood. Nikon D200. Nikkor 105 mm Macro. ISO 200. 1/80 sec at f/6.7. May 2014. Copyright Joanne Mason 2014.

The Dawn Redwood is one of the three major groups of redwoods, the other two being the coast redwoods and the giant redwoods f California. The dawn redwood is found all over, but was first known to grow in China. The dawn redwood has not changed for over 65 million years; this is known as morphological stasis – today’s dawn redwoods are identical to their ancestors of the Cretaceous period. Although redwoods look like evergreen plants, the dawn redwood is actually deciduous.

Redwoods in general are remarkable plants. They are the largest and tallest growing trees in the world, and they are among the longest lived, typically surviving beyond thousands of years. (The dawn redwood is usually much smaller.)

John Steinbeck wrote about the redwood,

The redwoods, once seen, leave a mark or create a vision that stays with you always. No one has ever successfully painted or photographed a redwood tree. The feeling they produce is not transferable. From them comes silence and awe. It’s not only their unbelievable stature, nor the color which seems to shift and vary under your eyes, no, they are not like any trees we know, they are ambassadors from another time.

In Travels with Charley, 1961.

Redwoods’ root system is very shallow (thus the fact that redwoods need much water and often grow in misty foggy environ). But the trees often grow in clusters (sometimes called a “cathedral” of redwoods, with the root systems extensively interlinked. It’s as if the cluster of redwood trees are all close siblings.

Rhododendron 2

Rhododendron. Nikon D200. Nikkor 105 mm Macro.  ISO 560. 1/60 sec at f/22. May 2014. Copyright Joanne Mason 2014.

Rhododendron. Nikon D200. Nikkor 105 mm Macro. ISO 560. 1/60 sec at f/22. May 2014. Copyright Joanne Mason 2014.

Today’s Rhododendron. The results of a gorgeous spring afternoon in the park. I think, after months of black-and-white, we’ll do some more of this color botanical work. Stay tuned, more to come.

Rhododendrons 1

Rhododendron

Rhododendron. Nikon D200. Nikon 105 mm Macro. ISO 200. 1/10 sec at f/13. May 2014. Copyright Joanne Mason 2014.

One of the loveliest and most majestic of spring flowers, the rhododendrons are now at their peak here in Connecticut. There are over 1000 varieties of rhododendron, found growing natively around the world. The rhododendron is the national flower of Nepal, the state flower of Kashmir, and the state flower of West Virginia.

Winter Bark 2

Winter Bark 2. Nikon D200. 105 mm (equiv 157 mm).  ISO 200.  1/250 sec  at f/6.7. March 2014. Copyright 2014 Joanne Mason.

Winter Bark 2. Nikon D200. 105 mm (equiv 157 mm). ISO 200. 1/250 sec at f/6.7. March 2014. Copyright 2014 Joanne Mason.

Back to trees. The rough bark of this tree in winter has a lot of character. It especially stands in contrast to the (deceptively) soft winter grasses behind.

New York Across the Bay

New York Across the Bay. Nikon D200. 200 mm (equiv 300 mm). ISO 200. 1/60 sec at f/22. March 2014. Copyright 2014 Joanne Mason.

New York Across the Bay. Nikon D200. 200 mm (equiv 300 mm). ISO 200. 1/60 sec at f/22. March 2014. Copyright 2014 Joanne Mason.

Skyline images are plentiful and often a cliche; it’s difficult to do something that’s a little different. In this image of the New York City skyline shot across Long Island Sound, what struck me was the relativity of spaces – ocean, city, sky. While the silhouette hints at the city’s magnitude, the city nevertheless appears dwarfed between the sea and the sky. (Actually, shot looking “down” the Sound towards New York, southwest from Greenwich Point.)  (Click image for larger.)

Glimmer 2

Glimmer 2. Nikon D200. 105 mm (equiv 157 mm). ISO 200. 1/8000 sec at f/3.3. March 2014. Copyright 2014 Joanne Mason.

Glimmer 2. Nikon D200. 105 mm (equiv 157 mm). ISO 200. 1/8000 sec at f/3.3. March 2014. Copyright 2014 Joanne Mason.

Here is another image of the same glistening rocks as yesterday’s post. The strong sun produced exceptional reflected light patterns, and the interplay of colors is fascinating. (Click image for larger.)