Category Archives: Uncategorized

Fall Scene, New Canaan

Fall Pond Scene. Nikon D200. 38 mm. ISO 400. 1/500 sec at f/8. October 2013. Copyright Joanne Mason 2013.

Fall Pond Scene. Nikon D200. 38 mm. ISO 400. 1/500 sec at f/8. October 2013. Copyright Joanne Mason 2013.

Here is another nice Fall woods scene. This is in New Canaan, Connecticut. (Click image for larger.)

River Reflection

River Reflection. Fuji X100. 23 mm. ISO 400. 1/200 sec at f/4. October 2013. Copyright Joanne Mason 2013.

River Reflection. Fuji X100. 23 mm. ISO 400. 1/200 sec at f/4. October 2013. Copyright Joanne Mason 2013.

This is the Byram River just above the dam at Glenville (Greenwich) Connecticut. I like this image. I wish I could say I planned it this way, but, alas, no. I was shooting the fall foliage along the bank and the reflection in the water. The more I worked with the image, I realized the reflection in the water was what it should be. So I inverted the image and cropped. (Click image for larger.)

Barn Window

Barn Window. Nikon D200. 55 mm. ISO 400. 1/1500 sec at f/3.3. October 2013. Copyright Joanne Mason 2013.

Barn Window. Nikon D200. 55 mm. ISO 400. 1/1500 sec at f/3.3. October 2013. Copyright Joanne Mason 2013.

Red Barn. Fuji X100. 23 mm. 1/550 sec f/8.0 @ ISO 800. May 2013. Copyright 2013 Joanne Mason.

Red Barn.

I’ve shot this barn before. (See the thumbnail at right. Was posted here.) It’s at the Greenwich Audubon Sanctuary and has a lot of character. The current image was shot on a warm fall afternoon in strong sunlight. The way the white window stood out against the wall and the shadows was most striking. (Click images for larger.)

Spring in the Park

Spring in the Park. Nikon D200. 105mm Micro Nikkor. ISO 800. 1/1500 sec at f/5.6

Spring in the Park. Nikon D200. 105mm Micro Nikkor. ISO 800. 1/1500 sec at f/5.6. April 2013. Copyright Joanne Mason 2013.

Spring in Connecticut is in full bloom. I love the pastel colors of spring. This image is from a late afternoon stroll in the park on a lovely spring day. (Click for larger.)

Extraordinary Vision

If you like outdoor photography, and you have an iPad, you must get the new iPad magazine, Extraordinary Vision. Extraordinary Vision

Extraordinary Vision describes itself as the first fully interactive outdoor photography magazine on the iPad. It’s also free (the app will make you subscribe after your first issue but the subscription is free). Extraordinary Vision focuses on photographic vision. There is a how-to element, but the magazine does not do reviews of gear or highly technical explanation. For the most part, it is “diversely talented photographers [who] openly share their insights and inspiration into what makes their images so powerful and evocative.” [From the editor's introduction.]

Extraordinary VisionExtraordinary Vision consists mostly of articles written by professional outdoor and nature photographers, including a small “in-house” crew, as well as articles fromĀ  contributors (which are actively solicited). The articles are well-written and the photography is fantastic.

True to it’s self-description, Extraordinary Vision is very interactive. Many articles include accompanying videos. A feature I especially like is that each article includes, besides the mandatory facebook and twitter links, links to the author’s website, to books and workshops the author has done, and in some cases a direct Extraordinary Visionemail to the author. The website links are handled by an in-app browser.

Many authors seem to have published books, e-books, and iPad apps, and Extraordinary Vision promotes those and includes links. Other than that, there is no advertising. This magazine is truly a labor of love, and it comes across, as the attention to detail, to high quality content and appearance, is evident.

Some of the interesting articles in the first three issues of the magazine have included an article on lighting (specifically looking at ten distinct kinds of Extraordinary Visionlighting and how to shoot for each), and article on composing pictures around water, an article on how to build a photography business, a wonderful article on shooting with long exposures.

You can’t beat the price – Free. Extraordinary Vision is a terrific almost one-of-a-kind addition to the range of photography magazine for the iPad.

(iPad link here.)

Extraordinary Vision

San Francisco Peaks – Snapseed Editing on the iPad

San Francisco Peaks, Arizona

San Francisco Peaks, Arizona. Copyright Joanne Mason

The San Francisco Peaks are the remnants of ancient (and not so ancient) volcanoes near Flagstaff Arizona and south of the Grand Canyon. They are very picturesque, especially in winter. I have posted numerous images from this region before. Recently, I’ve been working with an app on the iPad, Snapseed. I post this here as an example.

Snapseed was developed by Nik, about which I’ve spoken of very highly before (Nik here). Nik was recently bought by Google. There are now iPad, Windows, and Mac versions of Snapseed. The iPad version is free. Snapseed is an extremely efficient, slick, easy to use, and powerful photo-editing program. The iPad version makes some compromises. But the iPad provides an efficient and easy to use tool for photographers, especially in the field. So I have been playing around with it.

Here is the original image of the San Francisco Peaks.

San Francisco Peaks Original

(Click on the images for larger views.) This image was shot with the Fuji X100 and saved as a raw image. The image was then transferred to the iPad with the iPad camera connection kit and subsequently opened in Snapseed. The iPad retains the raw format and makes possible viewing of the raw image in the camera roll. Snapseed then does the raw conversion to a jpg. (Snapseed will only convert raw files if the images have been transferred with the camera connection kit.)

For the image above, and roughly in order: The image was straightened a few degrees with the Alignment tool, then cropped. Then converted to black and white. In the black and white conversion, several profiles can be applied; a “Contrast” profile was applied. In the black and white tool, brightness and contrast can be adjusted independently, and both were boosted. A red color filter was applied. Finally, a substantial degree of sharpening was done using the Details tool. The image was then exported back to the iPad film roll as a jpg.

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I’m Back!

I’m back! After an extended hiatus, I’m ready to start posting again on Random Sights and Diversions. Since last posting I’ve relocated from California to the east coast, although the move is only temporary. I’m looking forward again to posting photography, reviews, and commentary. I’m grateful for all my readers. I hope you enjoy, and leave a comment!